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BRAND IN FOCUS // HUSH x REFUGE

One of my favourite brands, HUSH, has joined forces with the charity REFUGE to create a beautiful sleepwear set; which will see all profits going directly to the charity.

HUSH say, “This season we are proud to support Refuge and their commitment to achieving a world where domestic violence is not tolerated and where women and children can live in safety”.

Together, they have created the NIGHTSKY limited edition sleepwear set with matching eye mask; the proceeds of which will all be donated to Refuge – with every set sold providing the equivalent* of one night in a safe house for a woman and her children. The set retails at £60, so for every purchase, a MASSIVE  £52* is donated by HUSH to Refuge. ​​

Some shocking statistics were highlighted for this campaign :
  • 1 in 4 of us will suffer domestic violence in our lifetime
  • 2 women are killed every week by an abusive partner
  • The Police receive  a domestic violence related call every 30 seconds

The work that Refuge do is crucial in saving lives. So while this is a really beautiful sleepwear set, I think you’ll agree, this truly is a life-saving and life-changing purchase.

Please support this tremendous cause by sharing across social networks, using the hashtags,  #hushNoMore and #OneforOne, and if you can purchase the sleepwear set,  you really will be making a difference to the lives of many.

 

ABOUT REFUGE

Since 1971, Refuge has led the campaign against domestic violence and has grown to become the country’s largest single provider of specialist domestic violence services. On any given day they support more than 5,000 women and children across the UK.
Sandra Horley is a force to be reckoned with. Head of the charity Refuge, she has dedicated her life’s work to increasing the awareness of the issues surrounding domestic violence and to improving the lives of those affected by it. Ahead of the partnership, HUSH sat down with her to find out more about the woman behind the UK’s largest domestic violence charity >>> READ MORE HERE

FREEPHONE 24-HOUR NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HELPLINE

0808 2000 247
Run in partnership between Women’s Aid and Refuge
If you are experiencing domestic violence and need support please visit www.refuge.org.uk

* Every set costs £60 (of which £10 is VAT). Hush will donate £52 for every set sold to Refuge (Registered charity number 277424).

Thank you

C
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BRAND IN FOCUS // Topshop x STRANGER THINGS Collaboration

AN EXCLUSIVE COLLECTION

Ahead of Season 2, Stranger Things is having a fashion moment. Be first with the trend and discover our exclusive, limited-edition collection of retro-inspired tees and sweatshirts (think beyond jeans and trainers, and style yours over floaty blouses and dresses or tucked into a velvet mini skirt).

As part of the TOPSHOP & TOPMAN exclusive partnership with Netflix, they have also transformed Topshop Oxford Circus into a Stranger Things-inspired world.

 

The Byers’ living room

Flickering fairy lights, an alphabet scribbled onto floral wallpaper and a glitchy TV screen… It can only be the Byers’ iconic living room, brought to life in one of the store’s main windows on Oxford Street.

Hawkins lab

Are you telekinetic just like Eleven? Test your superpowers in Hawkins lab, set at the front of the store.

Castle Byers

Will’s hideaway is complete with a cassette player blasting “Should I Stay or Should I Go” by The Clash, a JAWS poster and messy bunk bed. You can find it on the first floor at Topman.

The Arcade

Step into the Arcade on the lower ground floor to win big or head to the Upside Down if you dare…

Walk the corridors of Hawkins High and discover Nancy’s locker, as well as a shrine to Barb.

It looks bloody brilliant, doesn’t it?

Be sure to get down to Oxford St asap though, this special instore experience is only open until Tuesday 31st October!

Not in London? Head to Topshop Liverpool, Birmingham or Manchester Arndale for Stranger Things 2 window art, Hawkins High lockers, giveaways, Stranger Things merchandise and exclusive tote bags if you spend £60 or more.

Check out my favourite pieces from the collaboration below – and don’t forget Barb to settle down tonight for the Season 2 premiere!

SHOP >> STRANGER THINGS T-shirt //  £20
SHOP >> THE BOOK OF BARB // £9.99
SHOP >> BIKE SWEATSHIRT // £32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shop the entire collection instore and online here >> TOPSHOP x STRANGER THINGS collaboration.

Will you be watching the Season 2 premiere tonight?

C
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WORLD MENTAL HEALTH DAY // 2017

“Celebrating” my 30th birthday at Duck & Waffle, last year.

I’m full of all the “World Day’s” this week – apologies for that. But hey, I have a lot of causes that are very close to my heart right now – so I’m more than enthusiastic to support and raise awareness where possible.

Today is WORLD MENTAL HEALTH DAY, 2017. So here are a few words from my heart – to yours.

A picture tells a thousand words, doesn’t it? What you’ll “see” here (above) are two people who look (and practically were!) on top of the world ❤️ That day I got up at the crack of dawn – knots in my stomach. I felt so sick, so dizzy and was sweating from head to toe with worry. I was all-consumed with complete irrational fear and worry. I forced the smiles and the champagne and watched my watch till it was bedtime.

Anxiety and depression don’t know that today is your 30th birthday. Anxiety and depression don’t know it’s a sunny day. Anxiety and depression don’t know it’s a wedding day. Anxiety and depression don’t you’ve just had a child or lost one. Anxiety and depression don’t know you’re a comedian or an actress. Anxiety and depression do not know if you’re rich or poor.

Anxiety and depression do not discriminate.

Anxiety and depression puts lipstick on, whacks on a freshly ironed shirt, makes the breakfast and forces a smile on its face. Anxiety and depression sits in a room full of friends and loved ones, has the world at its feet and yet, feels like the loneliest person on Earth.  Anxiety and depression has a ridiculously social job – but is crippled with social angst. Anxiety and depression wants to do it all – and nothing at all, all at the same time. Anxiety and depression knocks back the medication and heads to the office for a day of high-flying meetings. Anxiety and depression heads to the umpteenth CBT session with a pram in tow. Anxiety and depression is a sensitive and soft soul who is strong as an ox. Whatever guise it comes in – just know Anxiety, Depression, OCD and allllllll the many, many other Mental Health disorders that there are out there, are not uncommon – in fact, 1 in 4 of us will be affected by at least one mental health issue. Know that in the majority of cases, mental health problems are indeed chemical imbalances – yep, just like diabetes and other well known ‘medical’ issues. So why the stigma?

Back in May this year, I put some words together for #MaternalMentalHealthWeek.  So here is a little bit more about me.

I’m a born worrier. Even from mega young, I worried the worst was about to happen. The worst case scenario of all situations. The made-up scenario’s in my minds-eye (don’t even get me started about how I am when James goes away with work/on a night out). Worry about not having something to worry about. This was to my own detriment and forced me into being an AWFUL teenager.

There was a time when I couldn’t understand my own sensitivity. There was a time when I was ridiculed for that sensitivity. The sensitivity that made me who I am. It was a running joke. It made me look weak. Fear not though, that ridicule has made me a better person. A stronger person 👊🏻💪🏽And most importantly, a better parent ❤️

It’s a sodding difficult job – this parenting lark. Daily life with a newborn is filled to the brim with anxiety. The sleep deprivation. The lack of knowing. The learning on the job. Inevitably, my anxiety was heightened just before I became a Mother. I had a dreadful pregnancy – followed by a horrendous birth. The first few months after Eli came Earthside, though a blur, were the hardest of times we’ve ever experienced.

It was our move to Berlin that connected the dots for me. Made me talk about our experiences prior to and into Parenthood. My anxiety was always prevalent. But its the talking that is so important. The understanding yourself and how YOU actually work.

Life as a new or experienced parent is SO TOUGH. The hardest and most relentless, but most rewarding, job in the world. Its an honour to be that boy’s Mama! ❤️It’s a daily joy and wonder! But for a person with a perinatal mental health condition the hard times are even harder, impossible even. The simple tasks are the most difficult. Everyday is a struggle to survive.

Your Mental Health is just as important as your Physical Health.

Don’t put it to one side.

Don’t brush it under the carpet.

Don’t shut yourself off or bury your head in the sand.

Don’t do what I did and convince yourself “I’m just a born worrier”.

Mental Health disorders can affect everyone. It’s ok to not be ok!

Share your problems.

Share your feelings with friends.

Share your thoughts with professionals.

Share with ANYONE you can. Sometimes talking to complete strangers is the easiest.

Start with YOU. Put YOU first – it’s not selfish. It’s necessary. And SO important.

Mental Health really does matter, but the only one who can make the change, is you✌🏻 Please, just don’t stay silent.

Likewise, everyone is fighting a battle you know nothing about. Stay soft in this hard world. Have empathy for yourself and others. STAY SENSITIVE. And be kind. Always 💘 Sometimes all someone needs is reassurance. And a really bloody big hug 🖤

C
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PS – I don’t think I’ll ever be able to be CONCISE 😂

PPS – I miss my white hair 👎🏻

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BABYLOSS AWARENESS WEEK // BREAK THE SILENCE

Break the silence

I can’t quite get my head around the fact that I’m STILL going through this Miscarriage. I never would have imagined it would be such a long process, drawn out process. Ok, for some, it is quite a shockingly quick and robust experience – but for others, it is marred with several medical intervention attempts and a hell of a lot of limbo.

As I’m currently going through this heartbreak – many other women, couples, families are also going through it too. Around the world. As I’ve mentioned many times, 1 in 4 of us will go through it at some point. 1 in 4 of you have been there. You know the physical pain, the emotional pain. So, I wanted to write a blog post dedicated to you, as today marks the beginning of Baby Loss Awareness Week 2017; which is held annually, globally, to remember those very tiny lives lost in pregnancy and soon after birth. The week will culminate with a Wave of Light on Sunday (15th October) at 7pm. See further details below.

Firstly, thank you. I’m not sure how else to say it – but thank you for all the kindness.  It’s overwhelmed me and I’ll never forget it.

Secondly, I’ve shared so much of my journey; I’m an over-sharer by nature. But mostly,  apart from this whole process being cathartic for me, I also wanted to share because thats how we learn. We learn from others’ experiences. What I found, was that Pregnancy & Baby Loss was exceptionally untalked about. It’s seen as taboo and very private – is that a British thing, or is that the situation worldwide? In general, I’m ridiculously British about things – I’m pretty naive, I’m pretty prudish. I get bashful at the mention of S-E-X. But THIS, this, I NEED to talk about. I also need you to talk out too. Let’s get together to break the silence of miscarriage & baby loss during this, Baby Loss Awareness Month.

I’d like to propose that my blog serves as a platform for you to be able to share with me. If your experience has proven too difficult to talk about openly, I am more than happy to publish stories anonymously. Whatever works for you – just PLEASE talk. Though I’m not known for being concise, this doesn’t have to be lengthy – just a few words from the heart to help yourself and others heal. It serves as such comfort and support – whilst also being therapeutic for yourself. Personally? I have found true solace in these online realms. I can’t be the only one?!

You can contact me via the comments below, FB & IG private direct messages or via email: claire[at]clairebriston.com

C
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Charities such as the following also have ways to get involved this week, in support for Baby Loss Awareness Week.

Tommy’s

1 in 4 parents will have to go through the heartbreak of losing a child during pregnancy or birth. We need your help to stop these tragic deaths. Please join Team Tommy’s and help us find answers and cures.

Losing a baby at any stage of pregnancy is a devastating experience. It is hard to believe that in this day and age, up to one in four women will lose a baby during pregnancy or birth.

Tommy’s exists to change the unacceptable statistics connected to baby loss.

Thanks to the support of our incredible community, our research has lead to a reduced stillbirth rate of 22% in Greater Manchester between 2010 and 2014 and a 23% reduction in premature births in high risk women attending our London clinic during 2014-15.

Learn more about the impact of our work here: http://bit.ly/2we9Cvk#Babyloss

DONATE >> Make a donation to Tommy’s, The Baby Charity.

The Miscarriage Association

Stories of good care
During Babyloss Awareness Week this year, the 40 participating charities and groups are calling for improved care following the loss of a baby during pregnancy, or during or shortly after birth.

As part of this campaign, we are asking people to share their experiences of good care they have received, perhaps from a midwife, sonographer, friend or colleague. If you would like to get involved, please email a story of less than 150 words to babyloss@sands.org.uk, copying us in on awareness@miscarriageassociation.org.uk.

You can find more details on the Babyloss Awareness Week website.

Wave of light this Sunday
Last year we made a special video slideshow using hundreds of candles that lit up our Facebook page in memory of babies lost far too soon. If you’d like yours included this year, please add a note ‘For the video’ when you upload a picture.

While Baby Loss Awareness Week can be a special time of remembering and speaking about loss, we understand that it can also evoke painful memories. If you need to talk, please feel free to call our helpline on on 01924 200 799 (Monday – Friday9 a.m – 4 p.m) or see our website for other ways we offer support.

DONATE >> Make a donation to The Miscarriage Association

Baby Loss Awareness

Share your experience – this could be by telling a friend about Baby Loss Awareness Week, talking about your experience or wearing a Baby Loss Awareness pin badge. You could also use our specially designed social media images on your website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, work intranet or noticeboard.

DONATE >> Make a donation to Babyloss Awareness.

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BRAND IN FOCUS // HUSH

HUSH are a clothing brand aimed at women of all ages who like fashion but are not a slave to it, who want to look good but don’t want to spend ages doing so, who want to be comfortable but not at the expense of style.

Australian born, Mandy Watkins is the creative director and owner of HUSH, having started it back in 2003 from her kitchen table with a laptop, a single phone and the perfect amount of optimism that she could start her own clothing label.

Just over 10 years later, her business has gone from strength to strength. Its “uncommercial” approach – which accompanies some very commercial product – is what sets it apart. Spotting a gap in the market,  Mandy initially launched Hush as a nightwear and loungewear brand. She had the idea she could suggest films for people to watch, and sell hot chocolate and blankets, to “make it more of an experience”.

HUSH now offers several categories, including daywear, swimwear, footwear and accessories.

I could quite easily buy EVERYTHING that HUSH design, testament to their conscious attention to detail of what the modern woman wants & needs. All pieces are made with a classic quality, meaning they’ll transition from season-to-season, and indeed, from year-to-year. Clothing is designed to be comfortable AND wearable. Accessories are used to enhance an outfit, with small leather goods and scarves taking a good focal point for Autumn/Winter. The Jewellery collections are simply beautiful – minimalist, yet eye-catching – almost all designs being made in both Gold or Silver, to suit your current wardrobe.

——

As the HUSH AUTUMN/WINTER 2017 collection has just launched, I thought I’d share some of my absolute favourite pieces. These will also be available to purchase in The Never Knowingly Concise Shop, along with a few extra bits! Let me know what you’re coveting in the comments section below or over on IG.

CLICK TO SHOP >> Lightning Bolt Jumper // £85

 

CLICK TO SHOP >> Andes Bell Sleeve Top // £89

 

CLICK TO SHOP >> Leopard Fur Coat // £220

 

CLICK TO SHOP >> Hera Maxi Dress // £149
CLICK TO SHOP >> Mini Tassel Earrings // £35
CLICK TO SHOP >> Lightning Necklace – Gold // £42

 

CLICK TO SHOP >> Tansy Dress – Green // £65

 

CLICK TO SHOP >> Majestic Star Trainer – £169

C
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Miscarriage & Me // An Update: 3

As I’m currently bed-bound, I thought I’d try and get my brain back into some kind of ‘gear’ and write an update on my miscarriage journey. The final one, I hope.

See also:
READ MORE >> Miscarriage & Me.
READ MORE >> Miscarriage & Me // An Update.
READ MORE >> Miscarriage & Me // An Update: 2.

—–

After lack of bleeding from my Medical Management, we went into the scan on Monday 2nd October kind-of hopeful.  We had the Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist, Dr Anita-Rao, along with our Sonography staff. Dr Anita-Rao had all my (many) previous scans in front of her, I knew by the movements of the scanner and her face that it wasn’t good news…

She put the probe down and moved the screen towards us. The sodding sac was STILL there. But it gets worse… not only was it STILL there, but it had GROWN. The empty sac had increased. I couldn’t believe it. I’d lost so much tissue and blood during my Medical Management, so how could this have happened? It was all kinds of insane. I went into that bubble of your own, where you can hear the sounds of conversation – but can’t make out the words. According to James, the Consultant explained that the hormones given during the Medical Management had encouraged an increase in amniotic fluid – thus enabling the sac to grow/fill with fluid. She showed us a heat map, indicating no blood flow, no heart beat, no life. By this point I would have been 16 weeks pregnant – the sac had increased in size from 7 weeks and 1 day (at the 12 week scan) to measuring 8 weeks. Dr Anita-Rao advised the only way to go forward with this now was Surgery. The dreaded (ERPC or ERPoC, which stands for Evacuation of Retained Products of Conception. You might hear it called it a D & C too) which is under anaesthetic.

Dr Anita-Rao then said “Ok Claire, let’s get you sat next door and make you a bit more comfortable”. To which I jumped off the bed and shouted “WHAAAAAAAT!”. As I was in my little bubble, I didn’t catch what the conversation actually was, and I thought they were going to take me off to theatre, there and then. Obviously, my first thoughts were – “My darling Eli! – he’s at school – I need to see him”.

What they actually meant was, they wanted to go back to the Quiet Room to discuss the procedure/dates/times.

Midwife Amelia came back to us, once again – so wonderfully compassionate and with genuine empathy. We discussed the Surgical Management of Miscarriage and she handed me the instructions for patients ahead of General Anaesthetic. I was booked in for the morning surgery on Wednesday 4th October – therefore, had to be at Broomfield Hospital for 7:30am (being Nil By Mouth from 2:30am).

LOOK AT THIS LIST.
JUST LOOK.
My favourite thing on this list? The SILVER LINING in this whole experience…. take a look at number 5:
5) I will undertake to refrain from the following activities for at least 48 hours after the anaesthetic (please note that depending on the nature of the surgery this period may be longer);

  • Not to drive a car, motorbike or bicycle
  • Operate machinery or cook
  • Engage in any sporting activities
  • Return to work
  • Drink alcohol or take drugs, other than those prescribed
  • Sign any legally binding documents

YAAAAAAS to no driving, cooking (and cleaning) or signing of legal documents. Though, this did implicate James working – thankfully he works for a very understanding company. We don’t have any family down here, so we’re reliant upon eachother in times of need – and our friends help out around us as best as we can all manage.

So that was that. We had all our questions and concerns answered by Midwife Amelia and given well wishes for the future. I also had to not apply any perfumes and wash with this ^ Octenisan – in aid of protecting against MRSA.

Wednesday 4th October
A301 – Theatre & Day Surgery – Broomfield Hospital

Upon arrival at 7:30am, we were in a large waiting area of A301. My name, along with around 30 other names, was called and we were escorted by the Pre-Anaesthetic team to ‘Recovery 2’ ward, waiting area. There were separate waiting area’s for Males & Females (adult surgery, only), the signs said this was in line with ‘protecting dignity’.

We were both acknowledged as being there – despite me being the patient. Which I thought was really kind of the staff. We both sat on a green chair each – all freshly cleaned (with green warning stickers to say so). I reclined the chair and waited for my first set of assessments.

We weren’t waiting long before I was ushered off to a side cubical and given details of who I would speak to and having my ob’s taken. After a bit of back and forth between waiting areas (and a lot of apologies and friendly chatter), I was sat down finally in another cubicle and awaited a chat with my Anaesthetist. Dr John finally came along – he had a familiar face – a bit like that of Actor James Redmond. I talked through how petrified I was of ‘being put to sleep’. He talked through the process, reassured me no-end and I felt so much better about the entire situation. I signed some forms and he said he’d see me again, just before theatre.

I then awaited a chat with my surgeon, Dr Mistry. Dr Mistry, again settled my nerves about the actual procedure. We talked about the fact I was left in quite a state after an Episiotomy gone very wrong, following the birth of Eli (which left me with early-caught-Sepsis and a very damaged undercarriage that was left to heal ‘on it’s own’ for neigh on 2 years). (Yep, not had a lot of luck on my side to be honest!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I was then told that I was at the bottom of the list for the morning surgery. My last meal was at 9pm the night before (having only had a bit of water when I got up at 5:30am). By this time it was 10:30am and I was SO THIRSTY! I drink a lot of water, every day – more out of habit than anything else! But it was driving me crazy not being able to even wet my mouth.

I was given lots of updates and eventually told at 11:45am that I was ‘next’.

12:15 arrived and a lovely lady came with all my notes to take me to theatre. James and I said our “I love you’s” and off I went. I know it was a straight forward procedure, I know it wasn’t complicated, but the fact I was being put under anaesthetic, as a MOTHER, petrified me. You just don’t know how your body will react to things like anaesthesia.  What if I didn’t wake up again? That was my big fear. Not the pain or discomfort. The FEAR of being put to sleep.

I thought I’d be taken down to the theatre on a bed, but instead, I had to walk there. It was a short walk. But I balled my eyes out the entire way. The nurse who took me along was brilliant – she wrapped her arms around me tightly and told me that she knew it was scary, but it would be fine. I needed her comfort. We walked into a room marked, Theatre 18.  Once inside, she explained that this was the Pre-Anaesthetic room, where I would be put to sleep – once under, I’d then be taken through to the actual theatre. She took off my sliders and undid the back of my hospital gown and helped me up onto the surgical bed.

She stayed with me for a little while – then the Anaesthetic room began filling with medical staff. I looked around at the mass of machines and equipment. I could see the theatre ahead of me, through some double doors. A few members of the surgical team went through the doors – the light above now highlighted ‘IN USE’. I closed my eyes each time someone went through the doors. I didn’t want to ‘go to sleep’  to the view of the theatre. It was insanely bright and white. And frankly, it scared me. Maybe I’ve seen too many hospital programmes!

My lovely nurse then said her goodbye’s and passed me over to Julia. Who prepped me with chest electrodes, a blood pressure band & finger monitor and tucked me up under a blanket. She gave me tissues and stroked my hair. I was trying my hardest to be strong. But my god, it’s so hard when people are just so bloody lovely and all you’re talking about is your wonderful family.

Dr John prepped my arm for the cannula, as we talked about our trips to Cornwall. Everyone chirping in about their own experiences – so laid back! There were around 6-8 staff in this tiny, dim-lit surgical room by this point. My surgeon arrived with another doctor. All smiles.

Dr John administered the cannula (OUCH) to my left arm; and washed my vein out with saline. I remembered that cold feeling running down my arm, from when I had the drip during labour with Eli. The chatter was constant – this time turning to accents and how we’d managed to ‘end up’ in Essex. I could feel another fluid going down my arm and began fighting to keep my eyes open – focussing my attention on that ‘IN USE’ sign above the theatre doors – for I knew when that was out of focus, I’d be gone. I asked “have you given any anaesthetic yet, because I feel a bit weird?”. I then remember thinking, ‘they’re all chatting away to me so they can tell when I’m asleep – so I’m going to keep on chatting, so they can’t trick me’. It must have been Pre-Surgery logic… or something.

The last words I heard were “It’s now going to feel like I’ve just given you a few large Gin & Tonic’s, ok?”. I remember nodding and feeling really cosy… and that was it. Out like a light.

Fast forward to 1:30pm and I was on the first Recovery ward. My waking words were repeatedly “I love the NHS” and “Save the NHS” and “compliments to the staff”.  YAAAAAAAS to #SAVETHENHS. The nurse who was looking after me told me to stop being apologetic (!!!) and that I was fine and everything went as it should have. She then asked for my consent to check the pad that I’d woken up with. I was bleeding a normal amount – phew. She then told me it had taken a little while for me to come round. I was surprised, shocked… and then felt so incredibly sick. She grabbed one of those egg-cup dishes and kept checking my blood pressure. It was slightly high. My temp was 37.8. I felt so, so sick and dizzy. But just so relieved to be awake! She said they’d already given me painkillers and anti-sickness medication – then she administered a little more anti-sickness medication  for me. I then began feeling a lot better. Soon after, my stat’s began to normalise. In the time that I was settling down, I saw 3 patients transferred to the recovery ward post-surgery. It was so interesting to see. The quality of care was just incredible. The teamwork, the processes and attention to detail was above and beyond.

By 2:30 my nurse was happy to have me transferred back to the Pre-Anaesthetic ward, where James would be called to come and find me – I can’t remember her name, sadly. I wish I could. I was wheeled back to the ward in my post-surgery bed, feeling ridiculously happy? Not sure if this was a side-effect of the anaesthetic or if it was pure relief and the joy of feeling proud of oneself.

I played an ill-timed joke on James before he arrived on the ward – of which, he’s still pretty annoyed with me about – so I won’t go into it. Hah. But here I am, about 90 mins post-surgery. I had to be linked up to oxygen for a little while after as my level’s hadn’t settled.

But man-oh-man, that first water since 5am was SO GOOD. I drank a litre in a matter of minutes. It must have been about 3/3:30 by this time and I was told I could eat! SO EXCITED. I had a cup of tea and toast on their way. I don’t think ANYTHING will ever beat that tea & toast you have after childbirth – but this one, was pretty damn close!

James spread the butter and marmite while I supped on that lovely, perfect, cuppa! Oh it was so good. I had little pain/cramping. Nothing major – and like I say, I felt pretty bright in myself. I just couldn’t wait to get home to my boy.

I had a few after-care instructions to go over with the Senior Staff Nurse on the ward and would then be discharged. I signed a form to allow the Pregnancy Products to be disposed of, after investigation. I was given all the warning signs and symptom’s to look out for post-surgery – and told to expect bleeding for around 7-10 days.

Now then – I got home expecting to be filling pad’s and pad’s with blood. But again – I’ve had nothing. No idea if this is good or bad – but Dr Google tells me that this can be pretty normal. Infact, bleeding can sometimes begin a few days post-surgery, resulting in heavy bleeding with clots and a lot of pain. So with this in mind, I’ve sadly had to cancel my @LuckyThingsBlog night out tomorrow evening in aid of stayed rested.  I just can’t run any additional risk of infection at this point.

So here we are today, Friday 6th – 2 days post operation. I feel ok in myself, still.  I woke several times in the night with bad cramps – but after a few painkillers and a bit of To Kill A Mockingbird, I could cope and go back off to sleep. I feel generally achy (hips & back, must be from the procedure positioning) and my pretty bruised – I also have a massive ulcer in my mouth, from where the breathing tube went down my throat.

I have moments of sadness and waves of positivity. I’m mostly sleeping. Not really got a major appetite – though, as usual, I can drink my weight in water. So that’s fine. I’m not allowed to have a bath / stay in the shower for too long (again, risking infection due to open cervix) and I’ve got to keep those dashing surgical stockings pulled up to my knee’s (which is also fine, considering the cold snap – I have pleasantly toasty legs!).

I’ve been sent the most amazing Get Well flowers, plants, cards & chocolate. But mostly? I’m overwhelmed by the kindness I’ve seen in messages and comments – from friends and strangers alike. I appreciate every single one.

This has, so far, been my Miscarriage journey. Whilst I wouldn’t wish this experience on even my worst enemy, I do hope that in sharing my experiences, I have helped someone else. Just one person. This has been a truly cathartic process – and necessary for me. For me to heal and come to terms with things. It’s not for everyone – but if you feel the need to share, then please, please do. Miscarriage is such a common heartbreak that can happen to anyone. 1 in 4  of us – maybe even 1 in 3 of us. But we’re not just statistics – remember that. Sharing your story can make such a difference – not just to others who are going through the same horrendous journey, but also to those charities such as Tommy’s and The Miscarriage Association – that, as I’ve said before,  support crucial research into Pregnancy Loss – something that would not be possible without YOUR stories too.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart for all your kindness, guidance, advice, laughs and positivity. I’m not entirely sure what kind of awful position I would be in if I didn’t have the support of my friends and family both offline AND online. It’s meant the world to me – to us, as a family.

As before – it’s good to talk about things. So please do keep getting in touch and sharing your experiences. It’s the only way we’ll learn.

All my love,
C
✖️✖️✖️

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Miscarriage & Me // An Update: 2

Could not have picked cards that were more appropriate // YES MUM ORIGINAL Pack

I thought another ‘update’ was due from me & my miscarriage journey as quite a few things have happened since my last post >> Miscarriage & Me // An Update, (posted on 14th September). I’m sharing my experience because:-

1) It’s been cathartic for me to write everything down and actually go over what’s happened, as some days are a bit of a blur – especially with all that hospital jargon.
2) The only way to learn is from others’ sharing their own experiences – I had absolutely no idea how common Miscarriage was/is. It’s only through sharing that I now know so much more and understand so much more. It’s also been of great support for me (and I’m told by others – which has overwhelmed me like you’d never know). By allowing people in and allowing them to also share in their journey has kept me going.
3) Charities such as Tommy’s rely on people sharing their own story, to aid their crucial research into Pregnancy Loss.

This could be lengthy as I get up to date – but as I say, typing it out helps me to move along and have a bit of a ‘brain dump’, as it were.

Oh those ‘Quiet Room’ paintings again…

19th September
Re-scan // Broomfield Early Pregnancy Unit
The re-scan was done in EPU this time. Despite bleeding lightly, pretty constantly, since 27th August, I was quite shocked to hear that my scan was looking no different to the scan I’d had two weeks previous (the 12 week scan).

As the empty sac still measured at just 7 weeks, and by dates, I was now 14 weeks, the midwives advised that we need to now take some further action as it looks like my body (ridiculously cruelly) still thinks it’s pregnant and that sac ain’t shiftin’.

We were then lead to that dreaded ‘Quiet Room’ once again; where Midwife, Amelia, came to discuss my options once again. There was absolutely no pressure, but she did remind me that as things weren’t ticking over naturally and had been stationary for longer than expected – therefore leaving me open to potential infection. Ugh.

We talked things through – I was then booked in for ‘Medical Management’ Part One for Friday 22nd September; followed by Part Two on Sunday 24th September.

(Here is some explanation on Medical Management of Miscarriage – including some of that lovely hospital jargon, simplified. Scroll on to continue with my ‘story’).

What is Medical Management of Miscarriage?

“You may choose to have medication to remove the tissue if you don’t want to wait. This involves taking tablets that cause the cervix to open, allowing the tissue to pass out.

In most cases, you’ll be offered tablets called pessaries that are inserted directly into your vagina, where they dissolve. However, tablets that you swallow may be available if you prefer. A medication called Mifepristone is sometimes used first, followed 48 hours later by a medication called Misoprostol.

The effects of Misoprostol tablets usually begin within a few hours. You’ll experience symptoms similar to a heavy period, such as cramping and heavy vaginal bleeding. You may also experience vaginal bleeding for up to three weeks.

In most units, you’ll be sent home for the miscarriage to complete. This is safe, but ring your hospital if the bleeding becomes very heavy.

You should be advised to take a home pregnancy test three weeks after taking this medication. If the pregnancy test shows you’re still pregnant, you may need to have further tests to make sure you don’t have a molar pregnancy or an ectopic pregnancy.

You may be advised to contact your healthcare professional to discuss your options if bleeding hasn’t started within 24 hours of taking the medication.”

– Information taken from NHS Guidelines for Medical Management of Miscarriage // Treatment.

What happens?

Medical management involves a single visit to the hospital. During this time, you will have pessaries (tablets) inserted inside your vagina, or you may be given the tablets orally if you are having vaginal bleeding.  These work by making your womb contract and push out the pregnancy tissue.  You may need more than one treatment with pessaries or oral tablets before the miscarriage happens.  You may choose to stay in the hospital or go home following the administration of medication.  If you prefer you may take the tablets home and take them yourself at home.  Bleeding may continue for up to 3 weeks after treatment.

Does it hurt?

Once the miscarriage starts, most women have quite strong period-like pain and cramps and some find the process very painful, especially as the pregnancy tissue is expelled.  This is because the womb is contracting and pushing (imagine tightly clenching and then relaxing your fist a few times) rather like the contractions of labour.  You are also likely to have heavy bleeding and pass blood clots.  You may see the pregnancy sac and it may be larger than you expect.  You might see an intact fetus, which may look like a tiny baby, especially if you are miscarrying after 10 weeks.  You may take Paracetamol or Co-codamol for pain relief, but you should not take Aspirin or Ibuprofen as they may make the treatment less effective.

Some women react to the medication with nausea and/or diarrhoea.

Are there any risks?

The risk of infection after medical management is low, at around 1 in 100.  Signs of infection are a raised temperature and flu-like symptoms, a vaginal discharge that looks or smells offensive and/or abdominal pain that gets worse rather than better. Treatment is with antibiotics.  In some cases you may be advised to have an ERPC.  You will probably also be advised to use pads rather than tampons for the bleeding and not to have sexual intercourse until the bleeding has stopped.

There is a small risk of haemorrhage; a recent study reported that 1 in 100 women had bleeding severe enough to need a blood transfusion.  If you have very heavy bleeding or severe pain and/or feel unwell, or if you just find it hard to manage, you may ring your Early Pregnancy Unit for advice, 111 or 999 if necessary.

Medical management is effective in approximately 80 to 90% of cases.  Where it is not, women may be advised to have surgical management – an ERPC.

What are the benefits of medical management?

The main benefit is in avoiding an operation and general anaesthetic.  Some women prefer to be fully aware of the process of miscarriage and may want to see the pregnancy tissue and perhaps the foetus.  Some women feel this helps them say goodbye.

Some women see medical management as a more natural process rather than having an operation, but more manageable than waiting for nature to take its course.  It may be helpful to know that if the treatment doesn’t work, you may be able to opt for ERPC.

Disadvantages?

Some women find the process painful and frightening, though good information about what to expect can help.  Some women are anxious as to how they might cope with the pain and bleeding, especially if they are not in hospital at the time.  Some fear seeing the fetus.  Bleeding can continue for up to three weeks after the treatment and women may have to have several follow-up scans to monitor progress.  This can be upsetting.  Some women will end up having an ERPC as well as medical treatment.

– Information taken from NHS Guidelines for Medical Management of Miscarriage // Obstetrics & Gynaecology Department

I was given the usual consent forms ahead of being  handed the Mifepristone along with anti-sickness tablets. I then had an hour to rest and had the typical stat’s taken before/after. All was fine and I was sent home. I had no pain, no nausea and more importantly, no bleeding in the 48 hours ahead of Part Two.

Although I was willing for SOMETHING to happen, nothing did. We went for lunch with my parents (who had visited for the weekend); and we even had a child-free trip to the CINEMA! (FINALLY saw Dunkirk, which is just the most incredible slice of cinema I’ve seen, ever, I think). The distractions didn’t offer up anything.

So we went back to the hospital bright and early on Sunday morning. I was mega nervous. I had a nervous tummy, sweaty palms and little-to-no conversation in me.

Sunday 24th September
Gosfield Ward – Early Pregnancy Unit – Broomfield Hospital
The ward was pretty silent when we arrived at just before 10am. Eerily so. No sooner had we arrived before I was changing into a hospital gown and laid on the bed in my private room. I was given more information about the procedure and had my stats taken. After the birth of Eli, I was admitted to hospital for a week  to treat  near-death early-caught-Sepsis. The experience left me with ‘White Coat Syndrome‘ – of which I have to explain to EVERY caregiver who has the joy of taking my blood pressure – “White coat hypertension, more commonly known as white coat syndrome, is a phenomenon in which patients exhibit a blood pressure level above the normal range, in a clinical setting, though they don’t exhibit it in other settings. It is believed that the phenomenon is due to anxiety that those afflicted experience during a clinic visit”. I have to say, I do feel for these poor individuals – I’m not the easiest patient to deal with!

By 11am I had ordered my lunch (from a pretty extensive and surprisingly appetising hospital menu!) and was awaiting the doctor to come with my medication to kick-start the ‘induction’, so to speak. I weirdly felt quite relaxed… I think it felt like there was finally light at the end of the tunnel. Maybe I was riding on nerves and adrenaline/anticipation.

The pessaries were inserted (all 4). Yes it was uncomfortable – and slightly painful – but it takes just a few minutes. So its completely bearable. I would then have to lay flat for an hour – hour & half.  Within 10 minutes the bleeding started. It suddenly became very, very heavy. We called for a Nurse (Lucy), who got me up out of bed and took me into my  private en-suite.

I was then given the ‘pan’ of which I would need to collect all tissue – which would then be taken for assessment. I’m sure all will agree that dignity is something very foreign when enduring anything child-baring related. This wonderful Midwife sorted me out at my most vulnerable – in the most caring and gentle way. She made no fuss and made me feel at ease; whilst giving me a ‘wet wipe’ bath to remove the blood stains from my legs and back. Sorry if this is a totally grim read – but I want to be honest. There’s no shame in any of this – and sadly, it’s just the way it is. This is the process. I won’t go into the whole NHS funding/Nurses wages thing – but my god, these wonderful, wonderful humans – they deserve the world. The things they must see, on a daily basis. I can’t even comprehend. What incredibly skilled and insanely caring people. Unbelievable. #SAVETHENHS

I spent my time back and forth from the bed to the en-suite for the next hour, when we managed to get the bleeding under some control and I could rest on the bed with maternity pads/bed pads. My lunch arrived – and I was ravenous. James went to the Hospital M&S to grab himself some lunch and for a bit of a breather too, I imagine. It’s all pretty gruesome and definitely something he’s coped with exceptionally well considering he was once very squeamish (he may well be squeamish still, not sure how you can’t be looking at what we went through this weekend – but he did a bloody marvellous job of comforting and supporting me throughout).  The Chilli I ate for my lunch was beautiful – really hit the spot and cheered my mood right up – as did the Harry Styles album I had streaming.

The afternoon was again spent back and forth from the bed to the en-suite (I couldn’t just stay in the en-suite, I wanted to be on the bed and cosy) with Nurses coming and going – checking my progress – checking the tissues I’d expelled and the bleeding – but not overstaying, which gave us some well needed privacy that I really valued.

By 3pm I was in need of painkillers. The cramps were getting really painful – not unbearable, but I didn’t want them to get to a point where I was in need of severe pain management. So the Midwife (Pankaja) nipped the pain in the bud with 2 paracetamol and liquid morphine.

Not long after, I was given the menu for tea – even though I’d anticipated I’d be home by now. So I reluctantly I ordered Chicken Tikka & Rice and a Rice Pudding. Yep three meals with RICE, in one day –  YOLO.  I’ve got to praise this hospital food – seriously! It was super tasty, a great portion size, hot and not in the slightest bit sloppy, soggy or plasticky – which is what I’d encountered previously. My body definitely appreciated the good food too.

By 5pm, I was given a pretty painful internal. Which even the painkillers couldn’t fend off. A huge light was brought in on wheels along with the paraphernalia you’d normally see when having a Smear Test…and/or having your waters broken. The doctors agreed that the bleeding would continue and were satisfied with my progress thus far – my Cervix was open – so that was a good position to be in. Though, they were not convinced that the sac had passed and began discussing the repeat procedure of the pessaries – which would mean an overnight stay. While the staff debated my situation, Eli arrived with my parents. They were going home that evening. Thankfully the bleeding was nigh on stopping and the pain had eased. So he just saw his Mama in her “really pretty” hospital gown – and my god, I was so happy to see him and we had the BEST cuddles. His affection made me forget about it all – made me zone out – for just a few moments. (He also said I looked pretty in my hospital ‘dress’. There’s a first!)

By 7pm, the Registrar had decided against an overnight stay and repeat procedure – I’d had too much medication for one day. Therefore, I’d be discharged with a letter, antibiotics and a repeat scan for 2nd October. So I have until the 2nd to finish expelling whatever is left.

I was discharged at around 8:30. I was shattered and it was a surreal journey home – it felt like 4am or something. I then slept. Slept and slept and slept. Never have I ever slept so much. I even SLEPT THROUGH on Sunday night, something I’ve not managed since well before Eli arrived. So that was weird too.

Since then – and up until today, Wednesday 27th – I’ve had little/no bleeding once again. Though I’ve had the odd cramp, back pain and baaaaaaad head. So once again, I’m in limbo. Has it all expelled? Is it over? Is it stuck?! Has the sac come away? Has my cervix closed up again?! Am I anaemic with all this blood loss? Is that why I’m so damn tired? Guess I’ll just have to wait it out until 2nd October when I get scanned again. (I’m also eating allll the kale, cavolo nero and spinach I can muster to get my iron on the up, incase!). If there are still some bits of tissue remaining/the sac still clinging on, then it will be off to surgery for me – for the dreaded Surgical Management (ERPC or ERPoC, which stands for Evacuation of Retained Products of Conception. You might hear it called it a D & C too) which is under anaesthetic.

Because we’re British and Tea makes everything OK again.

 

One thing I would say is though – Men/Partners do tend to get ‘ignored’ slightly during processes like this. I know I’m going through it harder – physically – but mentally, we’ve both lost out. We both desperately wanted that baby and we’ve both had the pregnancy loss. Both had the miscarriage.

Throughout the 30+ hours of labour with Eli, James was offered a cup of tea just ONCE. I was offered dozens of cups, despite being nil by mouth. The same happened again during this process – I was offered loads of tea/coffee. James wasn’t ever offered either – it was Sunday and the coffee shops closed early. So I really felt for him – he was going through it too – and yes, tea generally does solve a lot of things! If nothing else, it warms you up from the inside and gives you something to zone off with, even for just a few minutes. So perhaps it could be worth taking a flask of tea in – or whatever beverages/snacks you both need – should you be reading this ahead of venturing through this procedure too.

So there we are, thats where I’m up to now.

As before – it’s good to talk about things. So please do keep getting in touch and sharing your experiences. It’s the only way we’ll learn.

All my love,
C
✖️✖️✖️

 

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TIBA + MARL x Mama’s & Papa’s // Season Two

Tiba + Marl x Mamas & Papas Season Two has landed!

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I’m not currently looking for a new pram… yet. But the second collaboration between my Mum-Boss favourites, TIBA + MARL and high-street lovelies, Mama’s & Papa’s is pretty damn epic.

First of all though, I’m going to go straight to the new Miller backpacks that have also launched for this collaboration. The Miller design now comes in the bespoke navy leopard print and  in a stunning luxe metallic pewter finish – and also returning is the covetable black faux leather Miller too.

Pewter
Click to shop // Pewter
Leopard
Click to shop // Navy Leopard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stylish and practical, the MILLER is the ideal choice and leaves your hands free for a busy day out-and-about. Injecting effortless style in striking pewter, this backpack is large enough to fit most laptops and doubles up perfectly as a work bag, gym bag or carry-on bag.

I absolutely love both of these ^ As always, both back packs are completely unisex (can be used waaaaaaay after the baby & toddler years!) and come with the following features:

– Luxury padded changing mat
– Insulated bottle holder
– Internal laptop pocket
– Smart phone pocket
– Large exterior pocket
– 2 additional external side pockets
– Removable wet clutch / cross body bag
– Grab top handle
– Padded lower back panel
– Chunky metal zips with double pullers for easy access
– Metal feet
– Adjustable padded shoulder straps
– Wipe clean exterior and lining

Click to Shop // Urbo² Tiba + Marl pushchair 

Mamas + Papas’ award winning Urbo² pushchair is also given the T+M treatment, in signature navy Leopard print with a striking pewter chassis.  I literally can’t cope with how cool and pretty and cool this pushchair is. It’s just beautiful. Striking AND unisex. The pushchair itself can be used from birth, though a carrycot is also available in this design too. So what features does this beauty hold?

PUSHCHAIR // DETAILS
– The lie-flat position supports natural, healthy sleep.
– Compatible with car seats and carrycots for a full travel system.
– Reversible seat so baby can face you or the world.
– A compact frame with light, effortless steering.
– An easily adjustable handle you can adapt to suit your grip.
– The sunshade and insect net keep baby protected.
– The magnetic peek-a-boo window makes it easy, and quiet, to check on baby.

Age Suitability: Birth – 15kg/33lb
Dimensions: H: 104 x W: 54 x L: 86cm Approx.
Folded Size: H: 49 x W: 54 x D: 85cm Approx.
Weight: 9kg Approx.

Urbo² Carrycot
Click to Shop // Urbo² Tiba + Marl Carry Cot

Comfy, protective and bursting with style, our Urbo² carrycot is just what you need for those early months. And now you can stand out in style thanks to our latest collaboration with Tiba + Marl.

Showcasing a navy edition of their iconic leopard print, the canvas fabric is enhanced by the quilted hood lining and striking pewter and leatherette detailing.

CARRY COT // DETAILS
– The lie-flat position supports natural, healthy sleep.
– The magnetic apron tucks baby away quickly and quietly.
– The hood’s optional air vent keeps the cot cool and comfortable.
– The cushioned mattress offers even more comfort for naps on the go.
– The UPF 50+ fabric protects them from harmful rays.

Age Suitability: Birth – 9kg/20lb
Dimensions: H: 59 x W: 41 x L: 80cm Approx.
Weight 6.6kg Approx.

So not only are these super cool, design pieces; they’re practical and caring of your needs as well as your childs’. With this in mind, this collaboration does come in 4 options:

Pushchair ONLY – as above – £649

Carry cot ONLY – as above – £219

 

Click to Shop // 4 Piece Bundle

4 PIECE BUNDLE // £916.00 £799.00*

– Urbo² – Our stylish, city-living pushchair, with a striking pewter frame and luxury fabric detailing.
– Carrycot – Our recommended choice for 0-6 months, letting baby lie flat for a comfortable, natural sleep on the go.
– Adaptor – Easy to use, one-click adaptors to attach a car seat to the Urbo². Compatible with Aton, CYBEX Aton Q, Maxi-Cosi Pebble, Maxi-Cosi CabrioFix and BeSafe iZi Go infant carriers.
–  Universal Cup Holder – Perfect for keeping hands free, so you can concentrate on pushing baby and staying in control.

*You save this amount against the cost of purchasing the items together at their full individual prices.

Click to Shop // 5 Piece Bundle

5 PIECE BUNDLE // £1,091.00 £929.00*

– Urbo² – Our stylish, city-living pushchair, with a striking pewter frame and luxury fabric detailing.
– Carrycot – Our recommended choice for 0-6 months, letting baby lie flat for a comfortable, natural sleep on the go.
– Adaptor – Easy to use, one-click adaptors to attach a car seat to the Urbo². Compatible with Aton, CYBEX Aton Q, Maxi-Cosi Pebble, Maxi-Cosi CabrioFix and BeSafe iZi Go infant carriers.
–  Universal Cup Holder – Perfect for keeping hands free, so you can concentrate on pushing baby and staying in control.
– Aton Q Car Seat – A rear facing seat designed to make life easier.

*You save this amount against the cost of purchasing the items together at their full individual prices.

Click to Shop // 6 Piece Bundle

6 PIECE BUNDLE // £1,201.00 £999.00*

– Urbo² – Our stylish, city-living pushchair, with a striking pewter frame and luxury fabric detailing.
– Carrycot – Our recommended choice for 0-6 months, letting baby lie flat for a comfortable, natural sleep on the go.
– Adaptor – Easy to use, one-click adaptors to attach a car seat to the Urbo². Compatible with Aton, CYBEX Aton Q, Maxi-Cosi Pebble, Maxi-Cosi CabrioFix and BeSafe iZi Go infant carriers.
–  Universal Cup Holder – Perfect for keeping hands free, so you can concentrate on pushing baby and staying in control.
– Aton Q Car Seat – A rear facing seat designed to make life easier.
– Aton IsoFix Base- Click and go – easily attaches to your ISOFIX anchors for a secure and safe base.

*You save this amount against the cost of purchasing the items together at their full individual prices.

Additionally, you can also purchase the collaboration Footmuff, in signature navy leopard print,separately too – £89.00. This footmuff will fit most pushchairs with the 5 point safety harness fixing.

 

Click to Shop // Tiba + Marl Footmuff

COLD WEATHER PLUS FOOTMUFF // DETAILS
– Designed to fit most pushchairs and co-ordinates with the Urbo².
– The padded fleece lining keeps little one cosy and comfortable.
– Water and dirt resistant so it’s even easier to keep clean and dry.
– The four-way zipper lets you adjust the temperature to suit baby.
– Wind resistant to protect baby in colder weather.
– The multi-position harness holes allow you to re-position the footmuff as baby grows.

Age Suitability: Birth – 15kg
Dimensions: H: 100 x W: 52 x D: 18cm Approx.
Care & Maintenance: Machine wash at 40°.

So! There you go. What a collaboration! I don’t think these pieces will be around long – so get shopping! (I’ll be adding everything to The Shop shortly).I’m sure you’ll agree that this is a stunning design and beautiful pram that has been made in quality materials for longevity. Contemporary.  Effortlessly cool.  Practical. And just perfect for modern parents. We love you TIBA + MARL ♥️

Also, just want to say a massive CONGRATULATIONS to Anna & Lydia (TIBA + MARL  founders) for their incredible launch. Everything they’ve achieved is simply down to their dedication and ridiculous hard work. VERY proud of you both right now!

C
✖️✖️✖️

 

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LONDON FASHION WEEK // TOPSHOP SS18

Journalist Harriet Verney has her place in the fashion industry firmly fixed. This London Fashion Week,  TOPSHOP have enlisted her to bring you insider insight from the backstage area and beyond. Follow @TOPSHOP on Instagram to get your access-all-areas pass.

From the neon lights of Soho to the headlights beaming through the venue and the flashing cameras of on-site photographers – fashion week is always defined by all kinds of bright lights. This season, TOPSHOP are taking it one step further, so have your shades at the ready…

Ever since their very first  London Fashion Week show in 2005, TOPSHOP has casted the coolest girls in fashion. Back then it was Erin Wasson and Sasha Pivovarova, and other runway alumni throughout the years include Cara Delevingne, Karlie Kloss, Taylor Hill, Bella Hadid and most recently Adwoa Aboah. Who will it be this year?

So you gotta get ready for the new TOPSHOP London Fashion Week collection. Tune in at 4.15pm on Sunday 17th September to watch the show live and shop selected pieces straight after the runway.

The brand new TOPSHOP London Fashion Week collection is their most accessible and wearable runway edit to date.  Can’t wait to see the new collection – and its brilliant that you can add a touch of the show to your everyday wardrobe, straight away! Prices start from just £39.

C
✖️✖️✖️

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Miscarriage & Me // An update

Sharing my recent “bump” which was approx 11/12 weeks for #BumpDay in support of #MaternityHealth

————

I just wanted to give a brief update since my post last week: Miscarriage & Me. 

First off, I have to just say a big huge THANK YOU. Thank you to every single one of you who has commented or messaged or emailed or called me. I can’t tell you how grateful we are for the support and kind words. Once again, never ever underestimate the kindness of strangers. I’ve had so many messages of support for me sharing the post. For encouraging discussion. For highlighting what will/can/might/might not happen.

Miscarriage happens because of science. It’s not something you can stop from happening – I hope those who have experienced this horrendous plight know that.  Also, Miscarriage is more common than people realise. It happens to at least 1 in 4 pregnancies. Many miscarriages are unreported and some go unnoticed as it happens so soon. Experts think that the real figure might be 1 in 3*.

Miscarriage is not taboo. It is so important that we discuss this. To help others understand… to help yourself to understand. Without sharing stories, how can we learn? How can the medical professionals learn and continue their research into Pregnancy Loss? So sharing experiences, that is my biggest take away from this whole thing.

————

Just over a week on, how am I doing?

I’m going down the “Expectant Miscarriage” route with hope I have/am miscarrying naturally.

Well, I count myself as very lucky. So far, I haven’t bled anywhere near as much as I anticipated. As I touched on in my original post I have Endometriosis. So have been awaiting just the worst pain and the worst bleeding/tissue loss imaginable. I’ve had the back aches and extreme tiredness but again, nothing as bad as I’ve been expecting. I’m not sure if that’s because I’m going through a slow miscarriage – or whether its building up to some kind of cruel crescendo. I guess I’ll know more when I head back to the hospital next Tuesday for my re-scan and review.

So for now, I’m stuck in limbo. Not knowing whether its started, ended/ending or if it’s not even begun (properly). And this is the worst feeling – the not knowing. Just as bad as not knowing if you’re ok in the first place – before the bad news.

The entire pregnancy journey is basically just a whole load of anxiety and stress and endless knots in the stomach, isn’t it?

I feel like I need to do something good out of all of this. I know charities such as Tommy’s & The Miscarriage Association have a few ways to get involved. But if anyone does have any ideas that I can support, please let me know.

In the meantime, please do continue to share your stories. You can comment, message, email or bloody carrier pigeon your experiences or words to me. Always remember, sharing is caring.

All my love,
C
✖️✖️✖️

 

*Statistics taken from Tommy’s // The Baby Charity. Information on Miscarriage & Pregnancy Loss >> More details, here.